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Tumors

  • Lipomas are benign tumors of fat seen in middle-aged to older animals. Sometimes these tumors grow in between muscle layers are called infiltrative lipomas. Lipomas are benign and do not typically behave aggressively. Liposarcomas are the malignant form of the disease. These tumors are usually diagnosed by a fine needle aspiration, though biopsy or advanced diagnostic imaging may be required before surgery. Surgery is the best course of action for pets with lipomas and fat-based tumors.

  • Endocrine glands produce specialized chemicals called "hormones". These regulate and integrate many activities to maintain internal stability of the body.

  • Endocrine glands produce specialized chemicals called hormones. These regulate and integrate many activities to maintain internal stability of the body. The hormones pass directly into the blood to affect target cells elsewhere.

  • Anal glands are located on either side of the anus and normally produce secretions that are pushed when feces is evacuated from the rectum. An anal sac tumor is a tumor of made up of cells originating from the glands of the anal sac. These tumors can spread and therefore staging is recommended prior to surgery. To diagnose these tumors, a fine needle aspirate can be placed from the outside and into the anal sac to retrieve cells. After surgery, chemotherapy may be considered. Radiation therapy has also been considered as a primary or secondary treatment option.

  • A basal cell tumor is an abnormal growth/mass resulting from the uncontrolled division of basal cells. There is no known reason for the development of these tumors in cats and dogs; however, certain breeds of dogs and cats are more likely to develop basal cell tumors, including Wirehaired Pointing Griffons, Kerry Blue and Wheaten Terriers, Cocker Spaniels, Poodles, and Siamese Cats. Fine needle aspiration may aid to guide the diagnosis, but definitive diagnoses are typically made via surgical removal and histopathology. There are few reports of local recurrence and metastasis (spread) does not appear to occur. With adequate surgical removal, long-term control is likely.

  • Non-cancerous bone tumors are rare in cats and are mainly due to abnormal development. They include bone cysts and single or multiple lumps of bone in abnormal places (exostoses).

  • Non-cancerous bone tumors are rare and mainly due to abnormal development. They include bone cysts and single or multiple lumps of bone in abnormal places (exostoses).

  • The bone marrow is the soft tissue inside the bones. Before birth, the marrow contains the primary (stem) cells that from all the red and white blood cells. After birth, some types of blood cells, particularly lymphocytes, are made in other parts of the body.

  • Calcium deposits in the skin have a variety of causes. The deposits are usually of minor significance in the young but may indicate serious disease in some older animals

  • As continuous improvements in our knowledge and new and evolving methods of treatment are developed, pet owners and their veterinarians have more options available when cancer is diagnosed.